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Post by bigdaddyblue73 on Thu Jan 27, 2011 2:06 pm

Under the Dome by Stephen King




The setting for the story is a small town in Maine (See that one coming?) called Chester's Mill. For no known reason the town become mysteriously cut off from the rest of the world by an invisible force field that mimics the layout of the town almost exactly. The government has no explanation and several attempts to pierce the dome are met with failure. For the time being at least, the folks of Chester's Mill are on their own.

What makes the story so engrossing is that King does not spend a lot of time trying to explain science or theory as to why the dome is there. Instead he dives right into the effects felt by the people of Chester's Mill. Under the Dome is more of a portrayal of the human element of this event rather than the event itself, and it is here that King has always shined.

King's stories are always more character driven than story driven. We enjoy and care about the stories he tells because he quickly find characters we can root for, villains we can dislike, and people we can identify with. We can see ourselves and our friends and neighbors in the characters King writes into his stories. Stephen King writes about, not horror itself, but how people react to horrific situations.

Fans of King can think back to the best of his work and find that the stories would not have been nearly as good without the people in them. The Stand is a novel of over 1000 pages of pretty depressing stuff, but we find outselves really caring about what happens to the characters. Novels like Pet Sematary and Salem's Lot are so engrossing not for the vampires and zombies, but for the heroes struggling to deal with them.

It is the same way with Under The Dome. The struggles of the people trapped in Chester's Mill are very real. And their reactions, which are largely villainous and despicable, are also very real. The events that follow are ones we can easily see happening if this situation were occur in our own hometown to the people we know. The heroes are truly heroic and the villain of the story, while far more pedestrian than the vampires of Salem's Lot or the devilish Randall Flagg of The Stand, is very realistic in word and deed.

I do warn you, Under The Dome is quite long, at just over 1000 pages, but it is written in such a way as to be a very quick read, and addictive enough that you will have a hard time putting it down.

Head out for the bookstore and grab a copy. It is new enough that you may not find any in used book shops, but at the new privce it is fully worth the investment. And hey, what could be better than a long winter night curled up by the fire with a cup of hot chocolate and the King?



Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty


Blue's Recommends 10310 Blue's Recommends 11010 Blue's Recommends 10010






From Blue's Bookshelf--The Books YOU Should Be Reading.

Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty
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The setting for the story is a small town in Maine (See that one coming?) called Chester's Mill. For no known reason the town become mysteriously cut off from the rest of the world by an invisible force field that mimics the layout of the town almost exactly. The government has no explanation and several attempts to pierce the dome are met with failure. For the time being at least, the folks of Chester's Mill are on their own.

What makes the story so engrossing is that King does not spend a lot of time trying to explain science or theory as to why the dome is there. Instead he dives right into the effects felt by the people of Chester's Mill. Under the Dome is more of a portrayal of the human element of this event rather than the event itself, and it is here that King has always shined.

King's stories are always more character driven than story driven. We enjoy and care about the stories he tells because he quickly find characters we can root for, villains we can dislike, and people we can identify with. We can see ourselves and our friends and neighbors in the characters King writes into his stories. Stephen King writes about, not horror itself, but how people react to horrific situations.

Fans of King can think back to the best of his work and find that the stories would not have been nearly as good without the people in them. The Stand is a novel of over 1000 pages of pretty depressing stuff, but we find outselves really caring about what happens to the characters. Novels like Pet Sematary and Salem's Lot are so engrossing not for the vampires and zombies, but for the heroes struggling to deal with them.

It is the same way with Under The Dome. The struggles of the people trapped in Chester's Mill are very real. And their reactions, which are largely villainous and despicable, are also very real. The events that follow are ones we can easily see happening if this situation were occur in our own hometown to the people we know. The heroes are truly heroic and the villain of the story, while far more pedestrian than the vampires of Salem's Lot or the devilish Randall Flagg of The Stand, is very realistic in word and deed.

I do warn you, Under The Dome is quite long, at just over 1000 pages, but it is written in such a way as to be a very quick read, and addictive enough that you will have a hard time putting it down.

Head out for the bookstore and grab a copy. It is new enough that you may not find any in used book shops, but at the new privce it is fully worth the investment. And hey, what could be better than a long winter night curled up by the fire with a cup of hot chocolate and the King?



Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty


Blue's Recommends 10310 Blue's Recommends 11010 Blue's Recommends 10010






From Blue's Bookshelf--The Books YOU Should Be Reading.

Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty
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Goto page : Blue's Recommends Empty 1, 2




The setting for the story is a small town in Maine (See that one coming?) called Chester's Mill. For no known reason the town become mysteriously cut off from the rest of the world by an invisible force field that mimics the layout of the town almost exactly. The government has no explanation and several attempts to pierce the dome are met with failure. For the time being at least, the folks of Chester's Mill are on their own.

What makes the story so engrossing is that King does not spend a lot of time trying to explain science or theory as to why the dome is there. Instead he dives right into the effects felt by the people of Chester's Mill. Under the Dome is more of a portrayal of the human element of this event rather than the event itself, and it is here that King has always shined.

King's stories are always more character driven than story driven. We enjoy and care about the stories he tells because he quickly find characters we can root for, villains we can dislike, and people we can identify with. We can see ourselves and our friends and neighbors in the characters King writes into his stories. Stephen King writes about, not horror itself, but how people react to horrific situations.

Fans of King can think back to the best of his work and find that the stories would not have been nearly as good without the people in them. The Stand is a novel of over 1000 pages of pretty depressing stuff, but we find outselves really caring about what happens to the characters. Novels like Pet Sematary and Salem's Lot are so engrossing not for the vampires and zombies, but for the heroes struggling to deal with them.

It is the same way with Under The Dome. The struggles of the people trapped in Chester's Mill are very real. And their reactions, which are largely villainous and despicable, are also very real. The events that follow are ones we can easily see happening if this situation were occur in our own hometown to the people we know. The heroes are truly heroic and the villain of the story, while far more pedestrian than the vampires of Salem's Lot or the devilish Randall Flagg of The Stand, is very realistic in word and deed.

I do warn you, Under The Dome is quite long, at just over 1000 pages, but it is written in such a way as to be a very quick read, and addictive enough that you will have a hard time putting it down.

Head out for the bookstore and grab a copy. It is new enough that you may not find any in used book shops, but at the new privce it is fully worth the investment. And hey, what could be better than a long winter night curled up by the fire with a cup of hot chocolate and the King?



Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty


Blue's Recommends 10310 Blue's Recommends 11010 Blue's Recommends 10010






From Blue's Bookshelf--The Books YOU Should Be Reading.

Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty
Page 2 of 2

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Goto page : Blue's Recommends Empty 1, 2
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The setting for the story is a small town in Maine (See that one coming?) called Chester's Mill. For no known reason the town become mysteriously cut off from the rest of the world by an invisible force field that mimics the layout of the town almost exactly. The government has no explanation and several attempts to pierce the dome are met with failure. For the time being at least, the folks of Chester's Mill are on their own.

What makes the story so engrossing is that King does not spend a lot of time trying to explain science or theory as to why the dome is there. Instead he dives right into the effects felt by the people of Chester's Mill. Under the Dome is more of a portrayal of the human element of this event rather than the event itself, and it is here that King has always shined.

King's stories are always more character driven than story driven. We enjoy and care about the stories he tells because he quickly find characters we can root for, villains we can dislike, and people we can identify with. We can see ourselves and our friends and neighbors in the characters King writes into his stories. Stephen King writes about, not horror itself, but how people react to horrific situations.

Fans of King can think back to the best of his work and find that the stories would not have been nearly as good without the people in them. The Stand is a novel of over 1000 pages of pretty depressing stuff, but we find outselves really caring about what happens to the characters. Novels like Pet Sematary and Salem's Lot are so engrossing not for the vampires and zombies, but for the heroes struggling to deal with them.

It is the same way with Under The Dome. The struggles of the people trapped in Chester's Mill are very real. And their reactions, which are largely villainous and despicable, are also very real. The events that follow are ones we can easily see happening if this situation were occur in our own hometown to the people we know. The heroes are truly heroic and the villain of the story, while far more pedestrian than the vampires of Salem's Lot or the devilish Randall Flagg of The Stand, is very realistic in word and deed.

I do warn you, Under The Dome is quite long, at just over 1000 pages, but it is written in such a way as to be a very quick read, and addictive enough that you will have a hard time putting it down.

Head out for the bookstore and grab a copy. It is new enough that you may not find any in used book shops, but at the new privce it is fully worth the investment. And hey, what could be better than a long winter night curled up by the fire with a cup of hot chocolate and the King?



Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty


Blue's Recommends 10310 Blue's Recommends 11010 Blue's Recommends 10010






From Blue's Bookshelf--The Books YOU Should Be Reading.

Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty
Page 2 of 2

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Goto page : Blue's Recommends Empty 1, 2



The setting for the story is a small town in Maine (See that one coming?) called Chester's Mill. For no known reason the town become mysteriously cut off from the rest of the world by an invisible force field that mimics the layout of the town almost exactly. The government has no explanation and several attempts to pierce the dome are met with failure. For the time being at least, the folks of Chester's Mill are on their own.

What makes the story so engrossing is that King does not spend a lot of time trying to explain science or theory as to why the dome is there. Instead he dives right into the effects felt by the people of Chester's Mill. Under the Dome is more of a portrayal of the human element of this event rather than the event itself, and it is here that King has always shined.

King's stories are always more character driven than story driven. We enjoy and care about the stories he tells because he quickly find characters we can root for, villains we can dislike, and people we can identify with. We can see ourselves and our friends and neighbors in the characters King writes into his stories. Stephen King writes about, not horror itself, but how people react to horrific situations.

Fans of King can think back to the best of his work and find that the stories would not have been nearly as good without the people in them. The Stand is a novel of over 1000 pages of pretty depressing stuff, but we find outselves really caring about what happens to the characters. Novels like Pet Sematary and Salem's Lot are so engrossing not for the vampires and zombies, but for the heroes struggling to deal with them.

It is the same way with Under The Dome. The struggles of the people trapped in Chester's Mill are very real. And their reactions, which are largely villainous and despicable, are also very real. The events that follow are ones we can easily see happening if this situation were occur in our own hometown to the people we know. The heroes are truly heroic and the villain of the story, while far more pedestrian than the vampires of Salem's Lot or the devilish Randall Flagg of The Stand, is very realistic in word and deed.

I do warn you, Under The Dome is quite long, at just over 1000 pages, but it is written in such a way as to be a very quick read, and addictive enough that you will have a hard time putting it down.

Head out for the bookstore and grab a copy. It is new enough that you may not find any in used book shops, but at the new privce it is fully worth the investment. And hey, what could be better than a long winter night curled up by the fire with a cup of hot chocolate and the King?



Blue's Recommends Empty Blue's Recommends Empty


Blue's Recommends 10310 Blue's Recommends 11010 Blue's Recommends 10010
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